Multimedia

James Walvin, Professor of History Emeritus, University of York, UK

Reminders of slavery are everywhere, though we often overlook them. Look closely, and you will find them in the material culture we value so highly: from porcelain sugar bowls to mahogany tables, from necklaces of cowrie shells to the world of print and graphic art. Slaves not only enhanced the material well-being of the Western world but they also made possible the material culture we value—though often without seeing its slave origins. Organized in collaboration with the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, this lecture will serve as a prelude to the exhibition Enlightened Princesses: Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte, and the Shaping of the Modern World, which opens on February 2.

Recorded on location:
Yale Center for British Art
Lecture Hall
1080 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06510

A lecture given by Joanna Marschner, Senior Curator at Historic Royal Palaces, London, and Enlightened Princesses: Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte, and the Shaping of the Modern World exhibition lead curator, that is heightened with performances by actors Baize Buzan, Anna Crivelli, and Elizabeth Stahlmann from the Yale School of Drama (YSD), ’17. Directed by Kevin Hourigan, YSD ’17, the event is also supported by Yana Biryukova, video design, YSD ’17; Cole McCarty, costumes, YSD ’18; and Carolina Ortiz, lighting, YSD ’17.

Recorded on location:
Yale Center for British Art
Lecture Hall
1080 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06510

In this film, the British Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare MBE (RA) describes his new work, Mrs Pinckney and the Emancipated Birds of South Carolina, which was created especially for the exhibition Enlightened Princesses: Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte, and the Shaping of the Modern World. The sculpture was co-commissioned by the Yale Center for British Art and Historic Royal Palaces, Kensington Palace. Hazel Carby (Charles C. and Dorothea S. Dilley Professor of African American Studies, Professor of American Studies, and Director of the Initiative on Race, Gender, and Globalization) and Anna Arabindan-Kesson (Assistant Professor of African American and Caribbean Art, Princeton University) contextualize Shonibare’s work, which was inspired by a meeting, in 1753, between Princess Augusta and Mrs. Eliza Lucas Pinckney, the owner of a slave plantation in South Carolina, which was then a British colony. The dress worn by Mrs. Pinckney on the occasion, made of silk produced on her plantation, is featured in the film and currently on display in the exhibition at the Center, courtesy of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

A Cultureshock Media Production © 2017

John Styles, Research Professor in History, University of Hertfordshire, UK

The London Foundling Hospital, founded in 1739, was the first of a new kind of subscription charity, which multiplied across eighteenth-century England. Queen Caroline’s support was decisive and reflected her German background. This lecture explores how the Foundling Hospital came to initiate a new wave of enlightened philanthropy. It examines the contribution of the Hanoverian princesses, the influence of German Protestantism, and the ways art, architecture, and music were employed to raise the hospital’s profile and its revenues.

Recorded on location:
Yale Center for British Art
Lecture Hall
1080 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06510

Foundling tokens (left to right): padlock with band; coral necklace; metal engraved heart; punched and notched coin (three pence, silver, reign of King Charles II, 1680), 1680; six pence from the reign of King William III, 1696–97; The Foundling Museum, London, © The Foundling Museum, London